China

Nuove sfide per l'internationalizzazione delle imprese. Le imprese Italiane in Cina : Modelli di business e politiche di mercato

In a competitive context that is characterized by globalization and high economic and financial instability, companies must adapt their strategies in order to take advantage of new markets (Flint, 2004). Several empirical studies underline how business relationships are important for companies to develop their activities and business and to survive on national and international markets (eg. Hakansson, Snehota, 1995; Hakansson, Prenkert, 2004; Hakansson, Waluszewski, 2002; Johanson, Mattson, 1988). Other studies highlight that also cultural aspects are critical in establishing business relationships and in enhancing and maintaining ongoing business (Usunier, 1996; Hall 1976; Herbig 2000; Ghauri, Usunier, 2003; Fletcher, Fang, 2004).

 

The aim of this paper is to describe how Italian companies approach the Chinese market and in particular, how they have changed their business model to face the Chinese challenge. Particular emphasis will be given to relationships and their importance to achieve a long-term competitive advantage on that market.

The results of a both quantitative and qualitative research are presented. In the quantitative phase the behavior of Italian companies operating in China is analyzed through questions about the operative approach (marketing policies, instruments, product and process for quality certification) and the strategic approach (entry mode and approach to different targets), together with the results they achieved and the criticalities they had to face.

 

The qualitative phase is focused on business models and marketing policies that Italian companies adopt when operating in the Chinese market. For this, in-depth interviews were conducted with some "best in class" companies.

 

An evolutionary model on sustainable internationalization is then proposed.

Language of the paper: 
Italian
Abstract in the language of the paper: 

N/A

Authors
Cedrola
Elena
Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
Other
Ms.
Loretta
Battaglia
Università degli Studi di Macerata
Chiara
Cantù
Università degli Studi di Macerata
Ms.
Laura
Gavinelli
Università degli Studi di Macerata
Ms.
Alessandra
Tzannis
Università degli Studi di Macerata

Marketing to the bottom of the pyramid – opportunities in emerging markets

The significance of emerging economies to global marketing, within a context of a
paradigm shift of international business is enormous. With more manageable risks,
ease of communications and transportation, higher income growth and increasing
consumer purchasing power, there are new opportunities for multinational
corporations to both sell to and low cost, high quality resources to buy from.
However, emerging markets do not consist of one market. They are diverse and can
require separate market entry and market development strategies. This paper will
look at these opportunities through the lenses of two theories the Bottom of the
Pyramid theory and Blue Ocean theory. The Bottom of the Pyramid has been
pioneered by Prahalad and London and Hart to identify the potential of emerging
markets not only as resource suppliers but as a market. The Blue Ocean theory will
be used to see the potential of shifting paradigms in regards to emerging markets to
identify a leap in value for both consumers and producers. The purpose of this paper
is to show that emerging markets have two separate areas of opportunity for
multinational corporations: to buy and to sell.

Language of the paper: 
english
Abstract in the language of the paper: 

The significance of emerging economies to global marketing, within a context of a
paradigm shift of international business is enormous. With more manageable risks,
ease of communications and transportation, higher income growth and increasing
consumer purchasing power, there are new opportunities for multinational
corporations to both sell to and low cost, high quality resources to buy from.
However, emerging markets do not consist of one market. They are diverse and can
require separate market entry and market development strategies. This paper will
look at these opportunities through the lenses of two theories the Bottom of the
Pyramid theory and Blue Ocean theory. The Bottom of the Pyramid has been
pioneered by Prahalad and London and Hart to identify the potential of emerging
markets not only as resource suppliers but as a market. The Blue Ocean theory will
be used to see the potential of shifting paradigms in regards to emerging markets to
identify a leap in value for both consumers and producers. The purpose of this paper
is to show that emerging markets have two separate areas of opportunity for
multinational corporations: to buy and to sell.

Authors
PORTER
Marc
IPAG Business School
Omar
MAKTOBA
Napier University Business School
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